ISVS: Interprofessional Socialization and Valuing Scale

National Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education's picture
Submitted by National Center... on Nov 4, 2013 - 8:44am CST

Resource Type: 
Tool

The Interprofessional Socialization and Valuing Scale (ISVS) was developed to evaluate the beliefs, behaviors, and attitudes that underlie interprofessional socialization and collaborative practice in health care settings.

This is a 24-item tool with a 7-point scale used to assess the extent of shift towards collaborative care in health care settings. The tool has 3 subscales: ability to work with others, value in working with others, and comfort in working with others. 

Reference

King, G., Shaw, L., Orchard, C. A., and Miller, S. (2010). The interprofessional socialization and valuing scale: A tool for evaluating the shift toward collaborative care approaches in health care settings. Work, 35(1), 77­‐85.

PLEASE NOTE: Only those with paid subscriptions to the IOS Press database may access the full text of this copyright-protected article. Contact your institutional library or the publisher for details.

Tool Description

This is a 24-item tool with a 7-point scale used to assess the extent of shift towards collaborative care in health care settings. The tool has 3 subscales: ability to work with others, value in working with others, and comfort in working with others (King et al., 2010). 

Country Canada
Setting University
Professions

Medicine (7), Nursing (28), Occupational Therapy (38), Physical Therapy (11), Pre-professional program (8), Psychology (3), Social Work (3), Speech Language Pathology (1), Other (9), Clinical Kinesiology (1), Unknown (14)

Sample

125 students

Subscale(s) & Psychometrics ability to work with others

Internal consistency Cronbach’s α
3 subscales α=.79 ‐.89.
Whole scale α =.90.

value in working with others

Internal consistency Cronbach’s α
3 subscales α=.79 ‐.89.
Whole scale α =.90.

comfort in working with others

Internal consistency Cronbach’s α
3 subscales α=.79 ‐.89.
Whole scale α =.90.

Contact

gking27@uwo.ca

Author(s): 
Gillian King
Additional Tags (Optional): 
12