ATHCT: Attitudes Toward Health Care Teams Scale

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Submitted by National Center... on Oct 9, 2013 - 3:39pm CDT

Resource Type: 
Tool

The Attitudes Toward Health Care Teams scale (ATHCT) was developed as a pre- and post- measure or longitudinal monitor of attitudes toward health care teams among team members and/or trainees and their supervisors in clinically based team training programs.

The Attitudes Toward Health Care Teams Scale is a 20-item tool that has the quality of care/process (14 items) and physician centrality (6 items) subscales on a 4-point scale. The quality of care/process subscale measures team members' perceptions of the quality of care delivered by health care teams and the quality of teamwork to accomplish this. The physician centrality subscale measures team members' attitudes toward physicians' authority in teams and their control over information about patients. It can be used to determine the effect of educational interventions for teams  and evaluating practice-based team training programs for health care students and clinicians.

ATHCT is often used in conjunction with Team Skills Scale (TSS).

Reference

Curran, V. R., Heath, O., Kearney, A., and Button, P. (2010). Evaluation of an interprofessional collaboration workshop for post­‐graduate residents, nursing and allied health professionals. Journal of Interprofessional Care, 24(3): 315–318.

PLEASE NOTE: Only those with paid subscriptions to the Informa Healthcare database may access the full text of this copyright-protected article. Contact your institutional library or the publisher for details.

Tool Description

This version of the Attitudes Toward Health Care Teams Scale is a 14-item tool on the 5-point scale  that can be used to determine the effect of interprofessional education on quality of care and teamwork. The 2 subscales for this tool are quality of care/process and cost of team care (Curran et al., 2010).

Country Canada
Setting University
Professions

Nursing, Medicine, Social Work, Physiotherapy, Occupational Therapy and Psychology

Sample

137 students from several health disciplines

Subscale(s) & Psychometrics quality of care

Internal consistency Cronbach's α = .83

costs of team care (time constraints)

Internal consistency Cronbach's α = .83

Contact

vcurran@mun.ca

 

Reference Forchuk, C., and Vingilis, E., (2008). Creating interprofessional collaborative teams for comprehensive mental health services – Final report. London, Ontario: University of Western Ontario, Health Canada IECPCP Initiative.
Tool Description

Same as Leipzig et al. (2002)

Country Canada
Setting University and practice settings
Professions

Undergraduate students, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, Speech Language Pathology, Social Work and Psychology

Sample

363 students and practitioners

Subscale(s) & Psychometrics team value

Not reported

team efficiency

Not reported

physician's shared role on team

Not reported

Contact  

 

Reference

Curran, V. R., Sharpe, D., Forristall, J., and Flynn, K. (2008). Attitudes of health sciences students towards interprofessional teamwork and educationLearning in Health and Social Care, 7(3)146‐156.

PLEASE NOTE: Only those with paid subscriptions to the Wiley Online Library may access the full text of this copyright-protected article.

Tool Description

This version of the Attitudes Toward Health Care Teams Scale is a 14-item tool on a 5-point scale  that can be used to determine effect of interprofessional education on quality of care and teamwork. The 2 subscales for this tool are quality of care/process and time constraints (Curran et al., 2007).

Country Canada
Setting University
Professions

Medicine (195), Nursing (762), Pharmacy (113) and Social Work (109)

Sample

1179 students from 4 health disciplines

Subscale(s) & Psychometrics quality of care

Cronbach's α = .83

time constraints

Cronbach's α = .83

Contact

vcurran@mun.ca

 

 

Reference

Curran, V. R., Sharpe, D., and Forristall, J. (2007). Attitudes of health sciences faculty members towards interprofessional teamwork and educationMedical Education, 41(9)892‐896.

PLEASE NOTE: Only those with paid subscriptions to the Wiley Online Library may access the full text of this copyright-protected article.

Tool Description

This version of the Attitudes Toward Health Care Teams Scale is a 14-item tool on a 5-point scale  that can be used to determine effect of interprofessional education on quality of care and teamwork. The 2 subscales for this tool are quality of care/process and time constraints (Curran et al., 2007).

Country Canada
Setting University
Professions

Medicine (195), Nursing (762), Pharmacy (113) and Social Work (109)

Sample

194 faculty from 4 health disciplines

Subscale(s) & Psychometrics quality of care

Cronbach's α = .88

time constraints

Cronbach's α = .88

Contact

vcurran@mun.ca

 

 

Reference

Fulmer, T., Hyer, K., Flaherty, E., Mezey, M., Whitelaw, N., Jacobs, M. O., Luchi, R., Hansen, J. C., Evans, D. A., Cassel, C., Kotthoff-­‐Burrell, E., Kane, R., and Pfeiffer, E. (2005). Geriatric interdisciplinary team training program: Evaluation results. Journal of Aging Health, 17(4), 443-­‐470.

PLEASE NOTE: Only those with paid subscriptions to SAGE Journals Online may access the full text of this copyright-protected article.

Tool Description

Same as Leipzig et al. (2002)

Country United States
Setting Universities and teaching hospitals
Professions

Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, Social Work, Dentistry, Physical Therapy,  Occupational Therapy, Health Administration, Pastoral Counseling and Law

Sample

537 postgraduate students

Subscale(s) & Psychometrics attitudes toward team value

Overall Cronbach's α = .87 For attitudes toward team value α = .85 For attitudes toward team efficiency α = .76 For attitudes toward physician shared role α = .75

attitudes toward team efficiency

Overall Cronbach's α = .87 For attitudes toward team value α = .85 For attitudes toward team efficiency α = .76 For attitudes toward physician shared role α = .75

attitudes toward physician shared role

Overall Cronbach's α = .87 For attitudes toward team value α = .85 For attitudes toward team efficiency α = .76 For attitudes toward physician shared role α = .75

Contact

terry.fulmer@nyu.edu

 

Reference

Heinemann, G.D., Schmitt, M.H., and Farrell, M.P. Attitudes toward health care teams. In Heinemann, GD, and Zeiss, AM. (Eds.) Team performance in health care: Assessment and Development. (pp. 155-159). New York: Kluwer Academic/ Plenum Publishers, 2002.

PLEASE NOTE: Due to copyright restrictions, the full text of this book chapter cannot be made openly available through this website.

Tool Description

 

Country  
Setting  
Professions

 

Sample

 

Subscale(s) & Psychometrics  

 

 

 

 

 

Contact

 

 

Reference

Leipzig, R. M., Hyer, K., Ek, K., Wallenstein, S., Vezina, M. L., Fairchild, S., Cassel, C.K., and Howe, J. L. (2002). Attitudes toward working on interdisciplinary healthcare teams: A comparison by discipline. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 50(6), 1141-­‐1148.

PLEASE NOTE: Only those with paid subscriptions to the Wiley Online Library may access the full text of this copyright-protected article.

Tool Description

This modified version of the Attitudes Toward Health Care Teams Scale is a 21-item tool with a 6-point scale  that can be used to determine attitudes of  health care students on interprofessional teamwork.  The 3 subscales for this tool are team value, team efficiency and physician's shared role on team (Leipzig et al., 2002). 

Country United States
Setting University
Professions

Medicine (367), Nursing (135) and Social Work (89)

Sample

591 postgraduate students from 20 disciplines

Subscale(s) & Psychometrics team value

See Heinemann (1999)

team efficiency

See Heinemann (1999)

physician's shared role on team

See Heinemann (1999)

Contact

 

 

Reference

Hyer, K., Fairchil, S., Abraham, I., Mezey, M., and Fulmer, T. (2000). Measuring attitudes related to interdisciplinary training: Revisiting the Heinemann, Schmitt and Farrell attitudes toward health care teams' scale. Journal of Interprofessional Care, 14(3), 249-­‐258.

PLEASE NOTE: Only those with paid subscriptions to the Informa Healthcare database may access the full text of this copyright-protected article.

Tool Description

This modified version of the Attitudes Toward Health Care Teams Scale is a 21-item tool with a 6-point scale  that can be used to determine attitudes of  health care students on interprofessional teamwork.  The 3 subscales for this tool are: quality of care/process, costs of team care and physician centrality (Hyer et al., 2002). 

Country United States
Setting University
Professions

Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, Social Work, Dentistry, Therapy, Health Administration, Pastoral Counseling and Law

Sample

913 students in geriatric interdisciplinary team training (GITT)

Subscale(s) & Psychometrics quality of care/process

Overall Cronbach's α = .87 For attitudes toward team value α = .85 For attitudes toward team efficiency α = .76 For attitudes toward physician shared role α = .75

costs of team care

Overall Cronbach's α = .87 For attitudes toward team value α = .85 For attitudes toward team efficiency α = .76 For attitudes toward physician shared role α = .75

physician centrality

Overall Cronbach's α = .87 For attitudes toward team value α = .85 For attitudes toward team efficiency α = .76 For attitudes toward physician shared role α = .75

Contact

 

 

Reference

Heinemann, G. D., Schmitt, M. H., Farrell, M. P., & Brallier, S. A. (1999). Development of an attitudes towards health care team scale. Evaluation & The Health Professions, 22(1), 123-142.

PLEASE NOTE: Only those with paid subscriptions to SAGE Journals Online may access the full text of this copyright-protected article.

Tool Description

The Attitudes Toward Health Care Teams Scale is a 20-item tool that has the quality of care/process (14 items) and physician centrality (6 items) subscales on a 4-point scale. The quality of care/process subscale measures team members' perceptions of the quality of care delivered by health care teams and the quality of teamwork to accomplish this. The physician centrality subscale measures team members' attitudes toward physicians' authority in teams and their control over information about patients. It can be used to determine the effect of educational interventions for teams  and evaluating practice-based team training programs for health care students and clinicians (Heinemann et al., 1999).

Country United States
Setting Community and hospital settings
Professions

Medicine, Social Work, Nursing, Audiology, Pastoral Counseling, Dietetics, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, Recreation Therapy, Speech Therapy, Optometry, Pharmacy, Podiatry and Psychology

Sample

1018 interdisciplinary geriatric health care teams

Subscale(s) & Psychometrics quality of care/process

Quality of Care: Internal consistency Cronbach's α: = .87 Test-retest correlation: r = .71 (p<.001)

physician centrality

Physician centrality: Internal consistency Cronbach's α = .75 Test-retest correlation, r = .36 (p<.05)

cost of care

Costs of care: Internal consistency Cronbach's α = .72 Test-retest correlation, r = .42 (p<.05)

  Construct Validity: Quality of care/process correlated with anomie (r = -.35, p<.001), cohesion (r = .25, p<.001) quality of communication (r = .35, p<.001), team effectiveness (r = .39, p<.001). Strength of correlations range from r = .08 to .13
Contact

 

 

Reference

Brown, G. F. and Chamberlin, G. D. (1996). Attitudes toward quality, costs, and physician centrality in healthcare teams. Journal of Interprofessional Care, 10(1), 63-­‐72.

PLEASE NOTE: Only those with paid subscriptions to the Informa Healthcare database may access the full text of this copyright-protected article.

Tool Description

This  version of the Attitudes Toward Health Care Teams Scale is a 20-item tool with a 5-point scale  that can be used to determine attitudes toward quality, costs, and physician centrality in healthcare teams. The 2 subscales for this tool are quality of care/process and physician centrality (Brown and Chamberlin, 2002). 

Country United States
Setting Hospital
Professions

Medicine, Nursing, Social Work, Pharmacy

Sample

200 health professionals from 4 disciplines

Subscale(s) & Psychometrics quality of care/process

See Heinemann (1988 & 1991)

physician centrality

See Heinemann (1988 & 1991)

Contact

 

Author(s): 
Dr. Gloria Heinemann
Dr. M.H. Schmitt
Dr. M.P. Farrell
Collections: 
Outcomes-based Evaluation Tools
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