Attitudes of students in medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, and physical therapy toward interprofessional education

National Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education's picture
Submitted by National Center... on Jan 5, 2015 - 1:11pm CST

Resource Type: 
Journal Article

With the growing interest in interprofessional education and practice, methods to evaluate the effectiveness of related curricular activities are essential. The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) to assess the attitudes of students in medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, and physical therapy toward interprofessional education using the Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale and Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale and (2) to compare data with normative data previously reported. The two instruments were administered to 474 first-year students in medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, and physical therapy who completed the forms in the context of a workshop at the conclusion of the first year of an interprofessional health mentor program. Differences among professions were reported. Students in medicine and physical therapy rated members of their own professions significantly higher in the areas of competence/autonomy and need for cooperation as compared with those in nursing and occupational therapy. Along with reporting similarities and differences, the results provide additional normative data on these tools that can be used when choosing tools to evaluate interprofessional education attitudes.

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Author(s): 
Molly A. Rose
Kellie Smith
J. Jon Veloski
Kevin J. Lyons
Elena Umland
Christine A. Arenson
Collections: 
Literature Compendium
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