Defining Your Nexus

 

Defining Your Nexus: Building the Foundation for Aligning Practice and Education

A New Models of Care Require New Models of Learning Institute

 

2018 Workshop dates TBD

Location: Minneapolis, MN, Renaissance® Minneapolis Hotel, The Depot

 

Defining Your Nexus

 

Defining Your Nexus: Building the Foundation for Aligning Practice and Education

A New Models of Care Require New Models of Learning Institute

 

2018 Workshop dates TBD

Location: Minneapolis, MN, Renaissance® Minneapolis Hotel, The Depot

 

Through our work across the United States, the National Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education team is learning important lessons with our national partners every day. First and foremost, our work is teaching us about what it takes to create and sustain interprofessional practice and education (IPE) with the goal of benefiting all stakeholders in health. Based upon what we are learning, the National Center team has created Defining Your Nexus, a practical workshop to accelerate the work of health professions education and community-clinical teams.

Those who attend Defining Your Nexus will learn critical success factors from National Center mentors and grapple with their own thorny issues to develop a plan to use back home.

  • What do you need to consider at the beginning of building a Nexus IPE partnership?
  • What are important characteristics of a successful Nexus IPE team?
  • How do you develop and motivate a Nexus IPE team?
  • What stakeholders need to be at the table?
  • What are important engagement strategies for success?
  • How do we create a compelling vision for sustaining a successful partnership? 

Goal

Create a strong foundation of knowledge for teams that advances IPE efforts while effectively responding to unpredictable, but inevitable changing relationships with academic and community partnerships. 


What is the Nexus?

Today, a very real and substantial gap exists between health professions education and health care delivery in the United States. The goal of the National Center Nexus is to bridge this gap by creating a deeply connected, integrated learning system to transform education and care together. 

In our work throughout the United States, the Nexus is able to critically examine current evidence and practices to create practical models that can be integrated into different practice and learning environments more effectively. Pulling together vastly different stakeholders such as patients, families and communities; and incorporating students and residents into the health team to create better experiences, while improving health, and reducing costs.


Defining Your Nexus Outcomes

At the end of Defining Your Nexus, participants will utilize the National Center Nexus Learning System tools to be able to:

  1. Advance the developmental process of team-building with partners in their own settings.
  2. Shape a compelling vision for your Nexus collaborative work while committing to achieving a culture of health.
  3. Identify critical stakeholders and formulate an overall strategy to ensure meaningful engagement.
  4. Analyze important strengths/assets, opportunities, aspirations, and resources to mobilize existing resources in your Nexus.
  5. Develop a plan to cultivate and engage senior leadership.
  6. Formulate a critical success strategy to accomplish your team’s compelling vision.

Acknowledgements

Defining Your Nexus: Building the Foundation for Aligning Practice and Education was developed by the National Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education under guidance from the Nexus Learning System Advisory Committee and its chair, Susan Meyer, PhD, Co-Director, Pitt Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education, and Associate Dean for Education. 

The National Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education is supported by a Health Resources and Services Administration Cooperative Agreement Award No. UE5HP25067. The National Center is also funded in part by the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, The John A. Hartford Foundation and the University of Minnesota.