Critical Events of Interprofessional Practice and Education (IPE) – COVID-19 Version: Building Stronger IPE Together

Advancing Critical Events of Interprofessional Practice and Education (IPE) – COVID-19 Version: Building Stronger IPE Together


During the historic response to the COVID-19 pandemic, there is an unprecedented growing appreciation for multi-sector contributions to health, softening of boundaries around interprofessional collaboration, and extraordinary examples of teamwork. Overnight, we are observing seismic waves of innovation in telehealth, scientific discoveries, ingenuity, new device design, online education and simulations, among others. While these innovations seem like chaos today, they will forever change the way we work and live our daily lives.  Now more than ever, we need to document these changes to strengthen the field of IPE to build stronger programs together.

Documenting Critical Events of IPE During a Pandemic

Since 2014, the National Center has studied the forces and drivers of the impact of IPE on learning, health and systems outcomes to create an IPE Core Data Set and the National Center IPE Information Exchange1.  Developed during calmer times, one tool, the Critical Events of IPE, supports IPE Champions in capturing the unexpected events and decisions made during “forks in the road” for IPE programs.  

We reconfigured this tool for the COVID-19 experience and are making it available open-access and free of charge. The tool will enable you to document the effect of the pandemic on IPE implementation locally while simultaneously contributing comparable and sharable data to a national network for IPE Knowledge Generation.

1Delaney, C.W., AbuSalah, A., Yeazel, M., Kertz, J.S., Pejsa, L., Brandt, B.F. (accepted for publication). National Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education IPE Core Data Set and Information Exchange for Knowledge Generation. Journal of Interprofessional Care.

Definition of Critical Event of IPE

A Critical Event of IPE is defined as an unforeseen, unplanned occurrence that causes rethinking the original plan and may require a change in course. Critical events of IPE tend to be enabling or interfering forces that impact Nexus implementation and generally require confronting an unexpected set of circumstances that present ‘forks in the road’. These events often drive decisions about new directions.

A critical event of IPE can be a positive milestone advancing the viability and growth of the program, a negative occurrence that changes and slows progression, or a neutral effect on the program’s trajectory.

 

IPE Knowledge Generation and Evaluation Approaches During a Humanitarian Crisis


Watch Barbara Brandt, National Center Director, and Laura Pejsa, National Center Evaluation Director, describe how documenting today will lead to stronger IPE programs through IPE Knowledge Generation and Developmental Evaluation during a Humanitarian Crisis.  Listen to how Laura is using the Critical Events of IPE – COVID-19 Edition tool to document critical events for a Health and Human Services Administration (HRSA) grant program.  


 

Free, Open Access Tool – Local Documentation / Collective Impact

Use Critical Events of IPE to record any experiences or observations that you feel could have an impact on IPE, locally or globally.

Local Documentation
  • Use Express Registration to get started
  • Take a few minutes to document each meaningful critical event within the categories and reflect on expected impact on your IPE program. On average, each event takes about 5-10 minutes to record.
  • Access your report for your IPE program including the timeline and reflections from your submissions
  • Document as frequently as you like and anticipate quarterly prompts to update resolutions for your critical events

Register Today and Begin Submitting Your Critical Events of IPE

We are in this together: Collective Impact
  • Receive regular reports of submitted de-identified data
  • Join the National Center for collective impact discussions to build stronger IPE
The registration process is simple.  Follow the steps below.

New Users

  1. Use the Express Link to access the National Center IPE Information Exchange
  2. Complete the brief registration questions
  3. About You and Your Role:
  • Select Express Registration for IPE Critical Events
  • Enter the full, official name of your institution (i.e. University of New England) and zip code
  • Finalize Registration

Returning Users

  1. Use the Express Link to access the National Center IPE Information Exchange
  2. Log in using your email address
  3. Select the applicable program from the drop down menu
Tips for Submitting Critical Events of IPE
  • Use Critical Events of IPE to record any experiences or observations that you feel could have an impact on IPE, locally or globally.
  • Something is better than nothing, and real-time is better than memory. Try to establish a habit of taking a few minutes to enter brief Critical Events of IPE as they happen.
  • You don’t need to know or understand the full significance of these events now. We are creating a history, and will have time to revisit and reflect in the coming months and years.
  • Consider assigning a colleague who has more time and/or distance from the “front lines” to listen for and record your Critical Events.
  • Marking an event "Resolved" simply means that, in your mind, the event in question is relatively settled, or no longer in flux. You will receive quarterly reminders to update any “Unresolved” events.
  • You will always have access to your completed submissions on the Critical Events of IPE submission page.

 

The University of Minnesota Institutional Review Board (IRB) has reviewed the Critical Events of IPE tool and designated it not human subjects research.

This tool is entirely voluntary, and no personally identifiable information will be shared. Each person and site will have access to their own submissions, but will NOT have access to others’ information. The National Center will use the data collected to report on national trends (aggregate) in educators' and practitioners' experiences.